Posts Tagged ‘markets’

Warning: Duotrope Going Subscription

(I see it’s the time of year when the blog snows. Enjoy, Squiders.)

A few times over the years I’ve mentioned Duotrope as a good resource for those of us who write and submit short stories as they list markets and allow you to keep track of who you’ve submitted to, and what their responses were.

Duotrope has always been a donate if you can service, but starting on January 1st, they’re moving to a subscription model. They’re asking for $50/year, or $5/month.

If you can afford it and are willing to, go ahead and continue supporting them. However, one of the biggest complaints I’ve heard about this move is that the submission stats, which they list on each market’s page, are going to become skewed as many users stop using the site. If you use these stats, then keep this in mind. (I don’t.)

If you are using Duotrope currently, you may want to back up your information in case you lose access to it when they go to the new model. More information on the changes can be found here.

Here are some alternatives if you don’t want to pay the subscription price (which, to be honest, is a bit steep for the service they provide, IMHO. I’d pay $10, $15, maybe $20 a year).

Microsoft Excel (or, alternatively, Google Drive’s spreadsheet function) can be used to track submissions.

Ralan.com tracks markets if you write speculative fiction.

The Black Hole at critters.org also keeps track of speculative fiction markets.

The forums at Absolute Write often keep track of new markets and anthologies that are currently looking for material, as well as many other useful things.

If you know of any other services that provide similar things, especially websites that keep track of non-speculative fiction markets, please share the wealth, Squiders.

Short Story Markets

So, I was talking to my friend Anne (of Sky Shark fame) last week about short stories and anthologies and how I thought I would try a few more, and she said, “Wow, you know way more about this than I do” and hence I am writing this post.  To share my knowledge with the world, or at least that small part of it that occasionally wanders by.

As we discussed in a recent post, short stories are nice for a variety of reasons: they take less time to complete, it’s easier to juggle multiple submissions, and responses are more frequent. 

So.  Let’s say you’re looking for anthologies accepting submissions, or you have a short story you’ve written and would like to research markets for it.  Where do you go?

I’ve got three websites for you.

1. Duotrope
We’ve discussed this one before.  Duotrope, aside from keeping an eye on anthology, short story, and poetry markets, allows you to keep track of your submissions.  Markets can be searched by genre, length, or alphabetically.  It will also tell you acceptance stats, pay rates, and link you to the market’s website.  This is good for all genres.

2. Ralan
Ralan focuses on speculative fiction, though it also has humor, poetry, and greeting card markets listed.  Ralan divides markets by pay/non-pay and has separate categories for anthologies and books.   It also tracks response times based on the site owner’s personal experiences.  (The Black Hole also tracks response times for speculative fiction markets.)

3. Absolute Write’s Paying Market Forum
Absolute Write is full of useful bits (certainly not least their Bewares, Recommendations, and Background Checks forum, where every publisher or agent known to man is covered) and one of the most useful is their Paying Market forum.  Often you can find markets here that are not listed elsewhere because publishers will come to them and advertise their anthologies, new imprints, contests, etc.  They also have a Non-Paying Market forum.  What’s nice about AW is you can get an idea if something is a major fraud before you waste your time on it.

Hopefully that helps.  Anyone have anything to add to the list?  I write speculative fiction, so that’s where my experience lies, but if anyone has any recommendations for other genres, that would be great.